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100,000 Genome Project
Strand of DNA

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100,000 Genomes Project

Thirteen Genomic Medicine Centres (GMCs) have been set up in England to deliver the 100,000 Genomes Project, which was launched by the Prime Minister in 2012. Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are also joining the project.


Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Foundation Trust is part of the West London Genomic Medicine Centre, along with:

 

  • Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust (lead centre)
  • Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
  • The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust.

 

The project aims to sequence 100,000 genomes from around 70,000 people. Participants are NHS patients with a rare disease and their closest relatives, and patients with cancer. The aim is to create a new genomic medicine service for the NHS – transforming the way people are cared for by improving diagnosis and treatment.

 

Find out more about genomics

 

The programme is led by Genomics England, which is wholly owned and funded by the Department of Health. The main aims of the project are to:

 

  • bring benefit to patients and set up a genomic medicine service for the NHS
  • enable new scientific discovery and medical insights into rare diseases and cancer
  • kick start the development of a UK genomics industry.


Get involved

 

If you are a patient with a rare cardiac or respiratory conditionor lung cancer, for or and a genetic cause for your condition has not been found, you may be eligible to participate. If you are interested in participating, please speak to your clinician.

 

Email research-finoutmore@rbht.nhs.uk for more information about the project.



About the 100,000 Genomes Project


Identifying the genetic changes that may cause diseases will help us to better understand the disease and develop potential treatments.

 

Researchers looking at samples

The project focuses on two main groups:

 

  • patients with a rare disease and their families
  • patients living with common cancers.

 

These areas have been selected because a high proportion of rare diseases and cancer are strongly linked to changes in the genome.

 

By understanding these changes, there is potential to better understand how the disease develops and which treatments will be most effective.

 

Find out more about taking part in the 100,000 Genomes Project

 

Get the answers to frequently asked questions about the project

 


Sequencing human genomes

 

Identifying the genetic changes that may cause diseases will help us to better understand the disease and develop potential treatments.

 

At least 80 per cent of rare diseases are caused by changes in the DNA sequence, with half of all new cases found in children. Knowledge of the whole genome sequence may identify the cause of some rare diseases and help point the way to new life-saving treatments.

 

From a medical standpoint, the programme will provide a huge amount of data on a subject where there is still much to discover. This data will help health, pharmaceutical and biotechnology organisations to develop new diagnostics, medicines and treatments.

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